My applications to a Masters of Landscape Architecture

Hi Tony,

I would like to share the news with you about my applications to a masters of landscape architecture. I was offered admission to the University of Toronto, the University of British Columbia and the University of Guelph, with generous entrance scholarships for each. I would like to thank you for advising me with my project in architectural modelling class and for all of your advice on portfolios and letters of intent. A substantial part of my portfolio consisted of pieces from your perspective drawing and architectural modelling classes. I’m sure that your suggestions and the skills you taught me helped to strengthen my submission.

Kind regards, E.

A Composition Technique

Composition is, of course, an important skill to develop. Many books have been written on the subject. DaVinci is reported to have recommended that young painters look at mold stains on the walls and try to see landscapes. This is sometimes referred to as ‘forced’ or re-purposed composition. Henry Rankin Poore wrote on it in the 1800’s and is worth looking up.

The example here begins with a random picture of flowers. This is analyzed by gestural sketch. Next, look at the gestural study until you imagine a completely different subject image based on the  original compositional layout. This seems a bit forced at the start, but it becomes easier and quite enjoyable as you do it more often.  In this case one can see ‘a race between two cyclists watched by spectators.

 

Thank you K.G. – Teachers love to hear from appreciative students. Good Luck!

Hi Tony,

Thank you so much for your reference letter. I received the offer from UBC
Environmental Design Program!  Your courses really helped with my portfolio. Especially the museum  project, it made my portfolio stronger and more complete.  Additionally, remember you persuaded me from quitting the application last time we met in the hallway? You have no idea know how much I appreciate that.
Best,  K.G.

LINEWEIGHTS (2016)

I worked as a draftsman long ago. One of the techniques draftsmen learn is to apply a systematic ‘hierarchy of lineweights’ to enhance and clarify their drawings. Every draftsman learns to do this. It is important because it adds clarity and a kind of richness to drawings. You can also see it at work in comic books and skilled illustration of all kinds. There are probably several different systems for deciding on lineweights.  Here is mine.  I am showing it in a very simple way, but like a lot of seemingly simple things, it adds more than you would think.

SPACE DRAWINGS OF BUILDINGS USING CHARCOAL BLENDING STICKS – JULY 17 2016

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SPACEHEAD – Learning to see and draw ‘SPACE’

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