STEP BY STEPS For Highrise Model Project

This is a “Design Sketch Model”. Buildings designed with a physical sketch-model are different and more sculptural than buildings designed with drawings alone, even those designed with 3d computer programs.  Here is the general process for a modelling project I often do with my students. Every student alters and customizes the building design, often radically.We model and draw at the same time. Build it. Fix it. Cut it apart. Change it. It is not a highly finished plastic model. But they do look pretty good in photos.  I know other people often prefer aesthetically special materials, eg brown cardboard, archival matte board, white glue, etc. But foamcore, 2 ply bristol board, clear plastic mylar (this I do tint one side with spraycan), and hot gluegun  is the most flexible and quick combo for a conceptual model.  I prefer to keep everything sculptural and simple and FAST. The result does look good in photos – see some finished student models below.

A LOWRISE PODIUM HANDOUT_edited-1A TOWER HANDOUT 1 A STUDENT SAMPLES

ORTHO-DOODLE EXERCISE 1 OF 3 (2015)

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ORTHO-DOODLE EXERCISE 2 OF 3 (2015)

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ORTHO-DOODLE EXERCISE 3 OF 3 (2015)

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Accepted Carleton Architecture! Congrats…(click title)

http://issuu.com/guillermobourget/docs/guillermobourgetportfolio

(If you follow this link you will find many examples of architecture and other portfolios.)

Hello Tony,    This is Guillermo. I was enrolled in 3 of your courses at Emily Carr in the fall term, I would like to thank you for helping me develop my skills in architecture.  I received my letter of acceptance from Carleton University School of Architecture. For the last months I developed a Portfolio in which I included some art pieces we did in the classroom. I also included the model of the 15 story building we made in the modeling class, (well I made it at my home, but I couldnt have completed it without your guidance). Your website is fabulous it helped me out a lot to create an idea of what a portfolio should look like. I would be pleased if you take a look at mine at this link. If you have any ideas on how I can improve it please let me know. I would appreciate it a lot! I would be pleased if you put it up in your website, thank you again!     Guillermo

 – Congrats Guillermo, I am very happy you were successful getting into Architecture At Carleton. Looking at your portfolio, I honestly would not change anything. It looks casual, but organized. That’s the perfect message for a school audience. “Too clever is dumb.” Your highrise looks good and shows you can do 3D stuff. Perfect. Congratulations and best of luck. Stay in touch and give me your impressions of the school after your beginning year is over. You are justifiably proud of your work and your acceptance…Tony O’

SKETCH-MODEL EXAMPLE

IMG_3708 IMG_3728 IMG_3723 IMG_3712

Learn to do this in my Emily Carr course on “Building Architectural Models and Maquetttes”. This is a typical model built by one of my students. It took about 20-24 hours of work with hot gluegun and foamcore. It is a ‘design sketch model’ in that the purpose is to be able to build-change-rebuild during the design process. Generally, buildings designed with 3d modelbuilding supplementing the process are richer in terms of form. It can look quite finished if photographed carefully, but the main purpose is for design.

ACCEPTED TO UBC ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL! (Click title – link to portfolio below)

Congrats on your acceptance! (I just got this note from a recent student today. Jordan took several of my architecture related model-building, design, and drawing courses, all represented in his portfolio) :  

 Hey Tony!  I found out today that I was accepted into the UBC architecture program for this coming Fall. I could not have done it without your help and guidance, and I look forward to joining you in some more classes this summer.  I’ll attach my portfolio to this email in case you want to use it as an example on your website.  All the best,     Jordan

Grubner_Jordan_MArch1_2014Portfolio

BUILDING SKETCH MODELS (click title for pics)

ADRIAN BEHENNAH, a student who took several of my courses, built this model in 2014. The studio class starts with a basic plan provided, but participants are encouraged to use the model as an individual exploration of space and form in whatever direction they wish. Sketch models use a very easy process of foamcore and hot glue gun. Flexible window plastic can be found in report covers and at photography shops (tinted filter or lighting ‘gels’). The idea is to keep the materials simple and aim for a sculptural flexibility. This is very different from finished presentation models. The idea is build it quickly study it, change it, fix it, rebuild it, perhaps several times. Concurrent with modelling, the designers develop plans and other design drawings, working back and forth in 2d and 3d. The model  can look quite good when photographed even though roughly built. Many designers use this method. It tells us something quite different from either a drawing or computer model. I teach this method three times a year through Emily Carr Continuing Studies – BUILDING ARCHITECTURAL MODELS AND MAQUETTES. It’s fun and a great portfolio builder! Include several angles and a process shot (with your hands cutting components at an early stage) and it makes a very impressive page for your portfolio whether for schools or resume. It’s important to caption it as a ‘study in model building technique’ rather than a piece of fully-considered architectural design which, of course, requires much more in-depth work.

ADRIAN BEHENNAH M&M2014 (5)M&M ADRIAN BEHENNAH M&M2014 (3).jpgADRIAN BEHENNAH M&M2014 (7)

M&M ADRIAN BEHENNAH M&M2014 (3).jpgADRIAN BEHENNAH M&M2014 (4)M&M ADRIAN BEHENNAH M&M2014 (3)